Home > Artists > Randolph Schwabe > Artwork

(click image to enlarge)


Lord Newton

Randolph Schwabe (1885-1948)

INSCRIBED WITH TITLE AND DATED 1930
CHALK ON TINTED PAPER
9 3/4 X 6 INCHES
PROVENANCE: THE ESTATE OF RANDOLPH SCHWABE
EXHIBITED: 'RANDOLPH SCHWABE. ARTIST, TEACHER, DIARIST', 9-27 FEBRUARY 2016

Thomas Wodehouse Legh, 2nd Baron Newton (1857-1942) was a diplomat and Conservative politician, and had been Paymaster-General during the First World War. Schwabe wrote of his sitting for this drawing in his diary:

Monday 26 May 1930
… Started drawing Lord Newton at 3pm. Clever old man, and amusing ... but to show what different worlds we move in he had never heard of Rothenstein, the Slade or the NEAC. He sat very badly and the drawing was a failure. His wife was painted by Sargent in Sargent’s young days in Paris, for 4000 fr. Sargent took a lot of trouble over it, about 40 sittings, but N says it is not like. Thorogood consulted me at Camberwell about the applicants for my job. Poor little Margaret Barker has applied but they would not consider a young girl. [Albert] Houthuesen and Coxon I recommended, but do honestly think Clause would be a better and more successful teacher, with his extreme enthusiasm and simple sincerity, also his sound drawing ...

Wednesday 28 May 1930
Lord Newton again ... did a new head, better in every way ... He expressed himself as indifferent about his own portrait: was doing it because it had to be done for the club. Told me about the Committee on the Westminster Sacristy. Archbishop Davidson asked him to sit, ‘as representing the man in the street’ – a product of our age, as Newton said, of all the things most disgusting; nevertheless he was tickled, and, liking the Archbishop, consented to serve. Says that Mr Tapper and the Dean wanted to seize the chance of immortalizing themselves. He, Newton was against it, and told the King, who pleaded for the Dean’s view of it as a necessity, that it would look like a sort of public lavatory ... An amazing talker, and clever. Spoke of the Chantrey Commission on which he also served. R A W, 3 o’c. Letter from Clausen saying that La Thangue has left a most interesting journal of his, which we ought to see, and possibly publish. Wrote to Mrs La Thangue.


Price
£850

Related Artwork