THE ILLUSTRATORS 2018 : LOW, SIR DAVID (1891-1963)

David Low was considered the most outstanding British political cartoonist of his generation. Able to capture recognisable likenesses with great economy, he produced the definitive image of a number of leading figures of the day. read more...
David Low was considered the most outstanding British political cartoonist of his generation. Able to capture recognisable likenesses with great economy, he produced the definitive image of a number of leading figures of the day. And he did so with a subtle combination of ridicule and insight, rather than exaggeration and condemnation. A key feature of his approach was the use of such symbols as the strong but stubborn TUC carthorse and the reactionary Englishman, Colonel Blimp.
David Low was born in Dunedin, New Zealand, on 7 April 1891 of Scottish-Irish parents. Educated at the Boys’ High School, Christchurch, he made his debut with the Christchurch Spectator at the age of 11 and, in 1908, became the paper’s political cartoonist. Later, he moved to the Canterbury Times (1910) and then the Sydney Bulletin (1911). At the Bulletin, his technique benefited from the influence of Will Dyson and Norman Lindsay, so that his lampoon of the Australian Prime Minister, entitled The Billy Book (1918), proved to be a bestseller.
The success encouraged Low to move to England, in the following year, where he began to work for the Star, evening stablemate of the Liberal Daily News. He established himself with the device of the two-headed Liberal/Tory Coalition Ass. In 1927, he became political cartoonist for the Evening Standard and, though a Socialist, was given full independence on what was a very Conservative publication. This freedom led to the creation, in 1934, of his most famous character, Colonel Blimp, the epitome of British Conservativism. During the 1920s and 30s, he also produced two series of literary and political caricatures for the
New Statesman. On leaving the Evening Standard, he spent a short, unhappy time at the Daily Herald (1950-53) where, however, he did produce another of his most controversial images: the TUC cart-horse. With some relief, he was taken on by the Manchester Guardian in 1953 and remained there until his death in London on 19 September 1963.
Low’s popularity as a newspaper cartoonist created, from very early on, a market for books of caricatures; those published around the period of the Second World War are particularly impressive examples of his incisive criticism. He has total command of his medium, both artistically and intellectually, and was considered the most outstanding British political cartoonist of his generation. This position was officially acknowledged in 1962, when he was knighted.
For a drawing of the artist by William Rothenstein, please refer to The Illustrators, 1997, page 238.
His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the British Museum, the National Portrait Gallery and the V&A; and the British Cartoon Archive, University of Kent (Canterbury). His papers are in the Beinecke Library (Yale University).
THE LORD CHIEF JUSTICE by SIR DAVID LOW

THE LORD CHIEF JUSTICE

THE DEBTS OF ART
ACTOR: 'AH, MADAM. WE OWE A LOT TO SHAKESPEARE.'
LANDLADY: 'AS WHICH I AM AWARE OF. MY TERMS WILL BE STRICKLY IN ADVANCE.' by SIR DAVID LOW

THE DEBTS OF ART ACTOR: 'AH, MADAM. WE OWE A LOT TO SHAKESPEARE.' LANDLADY: 'AS WHICH I AM AWARE OF. MY TERMS WILL BE STRICKLY IN ADVANCE.'

NIGHTMARE AND INSOMNIA by SIR DAVID LOW

NIGHTMARE AND INSOMNIA

RECONNAISSANCE FLIGHT by SIR DAVID LOW

RECONNAISSANCE FLIGHT

PRESSURE'S RATHER LOW THIS MORNING by SIR DAVID LOW

PRESSURE'S RATHER LOW THIS MORNING

THE GYPSY'S WARNING by SIR DAVID LOW

THE GYPSY'S WARNING

ROAD SPEED CLASSIC by SIR DAVID LOW

ROAD SPEED CLASSIC

CALLERS ON NEGUIB by SIR DAVID LOW

CALLERS ON NEGUIB

THE JUDGEMENT OF WASHINGTON by SIR DAVID LOW

THE JUDGEMENT OF WASHINGTON

FORE! by SIR DAVID LOW

FORE!

PILOT THAT WON'T BE DROPPED by SIR DAVID LOW

PILOT THAT WON'T BE DROPPED

YOO HOO! LOOK WHO'S HERE! by SIR DAVID LOW

YOO HOO! LOOK WHO'S HERE!