SYDNEY HARPLEY RA FRBS (1927-1992)

The work of Sydney Harpley always surprised and delighted: dancers, acrobats, girls on swings were posed and executed with equal audacity and elegance. read more...

The work of Sydney Harpley always surprised and delighted: dancers, acrobats, girls on swings were posed and executed with equal audacity and elegance. Establishing the single female as his favourite subject while still as student, he rose to become the most popular sculptor, not only among Royal Academicians but among all who exhibited at the Royal Academy Sumer Exhibitions.

Sydney Harpley was born in Fulham, London on 9 April 1927. The son of an electrician and cabinet maker, he grew up in Dagenham, and spent the war years as an evacuee in Berkshire and Bedfordshire. Though talented in both art and music, he left school at the age of fourteen to take up an apprenticeship as an electrician. He went on to work at an American air base, and would later cite aircraft as a formative influence on his artistic development, describing planes as ‘sculptures in space’. Even more instrumental in his decision to become a sculptor was his encounter with the carved head of Ramases II, in Cairo, during National Service with the Royal Engineers (1945-48). On his return home, hÃe took evening classes in drawing while working at a factory in Roehampton making artificial limbs. In 1951, he became a full-time student of sculpture at Hammersmith School of Art, and two years later began to study under John Skeaping at the Royal College of Art.

While still a student, Harpley established the single female figure as his favourite form; he exhibited examples at the Young Contemporaries and at the Royal Academy, and sold his first pieces to the National Gallery of New Zealand and the artist Fleur Cowles. In 1956, the year of his first marriage, he returned to Hammersmith as a part-time teacher and began to receive commissions for portrait busts and public figure groups. In 1963, he fully eÀstablished himself, winning a competition to create a portrait memorial to Jan Smuts, and being elected to the fellowship of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. From 1972, he taught part-time at Leicester polytechnic, and while there met his second wife Jo, an art historian specialising in costume. Marrying in 1981, they moved to Radigan Farm, Somerset (1986) and then to Kilkenny, in Ireland (1989). At the height of his career, Harpley became a Royal Academician (ARA 1974, RA 1981) and had a number of successful international solo shows, including two at the Chris Beetles Gallery in 1987 and 1990. He died in Dublin on 9 March 1992.


The estate of Sydney Harpley is represented by Chris Beetles Ltd.

Pretty WomenChildrenPortraitsCats
Ballet & DanceSculptureModern British - Paintings & DrawingsFigures
NudesFashion  
GIRL IN FURS by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL IN FURS

L'APRES MIDI by SYDNEY HARPLEY

L'APRES MIDI

EARLY DANCER by SYDNEY HARPLEY

EARLY DANCER

YOUNG WOMAN IN AN EVENING DRESS by SYDNEY HARPLEY

YOUNG WOMAN IN AN EVENING DRESS

RAINING by SYDNEY HARPLEY

RAINING

SUMMERTIME by SYDNEY HARPLEY

SUMMERTIME

GIRL ON A SWING, 1981 by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL ON A SWING, 1981

HANDSTAND by SYDNEY HARPLEY

HANDSTAND

RELIEF HEAD by SYDNEY HARPLEY

RELIEF HEAD

NUDE ON A HAMMOCK by SYDNEY HARPLEY

NUDE ON A HAMMOCK

GIRL RUNNING by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL RUNNING

GIRL WITH AN UMBRELLA by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL WITH AN UMBRELLA

GIRL COMBING HER HAIR by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL COMBING HER HAIR

GIRL IN A FUR HAT by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL IN A FUR HAT

RECLINING WOMAN WITH A CAT by SYDNEY HARPLEY

RECLINING WOMAN WITH A CAT

FEMALE NUDE by SYDNEY HARPLEY

FEMALE NUDE

SEATED NUDE by SYDNEY HARPLEY

SEATED NUDE

GIRL IN A LONG DRESS RECLINING by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL IN A LONG DRESS RECLINING

BEACH BALL II by SYDNEY HARPLEY

BEACH BALL II

GIRL ON A HAMMOCK READING by SYDNEY HARPLEY

GIRL ON A HAMMOCK READING

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